Co-Hosted by

Contact

FINAL TOPICAL AGENDA

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 12

7:00 Registration and Continental Breakfast 

Part 1: OPENING SESSION

8:00 Welcome Remarks 

Rosenzweig_MichaelMichael Rosenzweig, DVM, PhD, Executive Director, Oncology, Merck Research Labs 


8:05 Title Sponsor Welcome Remarks 

Kogut_SusanneSusanne Kogut, Executive Director, Petco Foundation


Donegan_DanielleDanielle M. Donegan, Director, Strategic Partnerships & Event Marketing, Blue Buffalo Co.  


8:10 Chairpersons Opening Remarks 

Henry_CarolynCarolyn Henry, DVM, MS, Dean, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri 


8:15 Courageous Warrior Opening 

Aune_GregGreg Aune, MD, PhD, Pediatric Oncologist, Greehey Children's Cancer Research Hospital 


8:25 KEYNOTE PRESENTATION: Man’s Best Friend – In Health and Disease 

Kastan_MichaelMichael Kastan, MD, PhD, Pediatric Oncologist, Executive Director of the Duke Cancer Institute, William and Jane Shingleton Professor of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology 


Part 2: CAN HUMAN/PEDIATRIC ONCOLOGY DRUG DEVELOPMENT BE ACCELERATED BY INTEGRATING THE CANINE PATIENT?

8:45 Comparative Oncology Overview 

London_CherylCheryl London, DVM, PhD, DACVIM (Oncology), Anne Engen and Dusty Professor in Comparative Oncology, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine; Research Professor, Tufts University School of Medicine; Associated Faculty Professor, College of Veterinary Medicine, Ohio State

The fundamental similarities between canine and human cancers underscore the comparative utility of studying spontaneous cancers in pet dogs for accelerating the development of novel cancer therapeutics. Canine cancers typically recapitulate the disease biology and molecular and genetic complexities found in their human counterparts including response and resistance to treatment, intra/inter-tumoral heterogeneity, and activation of key signaling pathways that drive disease progression. Recent advances in characterization of the canine genome and the availability of canine specific reagents have facilitated inclusion of dogs with spontaneous cancer into drug development efforts with the ultimate goal of improving translational efficiencies. Clinical studies not only give pet dogs access to cutting edge treatments, but helps inform the drug development in human medicine, providing a unique opportunity to obtain critical information regarding pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic relationships, evidence of biologic activity and expected toxicities from novel therapeutics.    

9:30 Networking Coffee Break 

Part 3: THE COMPARATIVE ONCOLOGY TOOLBOX: PROGRESS, CHALLENGES AND NEXT STEPS

9:45 Introduction 

Schiffman_JoshuaJoshua Schiffman, MD, Professor of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology and Adjunct Professor of Oncological Sciences, Huntsman Cancer Center, University of Utah 


Part 3A: TOOLBOX: GENOMIC ADVANCES AND PRECISION MEDICINE

9:50 Canine Comparative Cytogenomics – Reagents and Resources to Ask Key Questions

Breen_MatthewMatthew Breen, PhD, Professor of Genomics and the Oscar J. Fletcher Distinguished Professor of Comparative Oncology Genetics, North Carolina State University 


10:05 Comparative Genome Landscapes and the Future of Precision Medicine 

Trent_JeffreyJeffrey M. Trent, PhD, FACMG, President and Research Director, Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) 

Human medicine is being transformed by knowledge of genomic catalogues of mutations that drive disease. These data guide diagnostic, biomarker and drug development while also increasingly being utilized to inform individual patient management. In veterinary medicine, disease genome characterization and its clinical utilization is still in its infancy, but a wealth of emerging advances that are improving the landscape of canine precision medicine hold value for pets and people. 

10:20 Comparative Genomics, Glioma 

Amin_SamirSamir B. Amin, PhD, Postdoctoral Associate, The Jackson Laboratory 

Verhaak lab has a specialized research interest in understanding disease progression of brain tumors, particularly glioblastoma and glioma. Our work in comparative genomics field is to outline molecular life history of glioma with emphasis on comparing cancer genome and transcriptome between spontaneously developing brain tumors in immuno-competent dogs and humans.

10:35 Tallwood Canine Cancer Initiative 

Mockus_SusanSusan Mockus, PhD, Associate Director, Clinical Genomic Market Development, The Jackson Laboratory 

The Tallwood Canine Cancer Research Initiative (TCCRI) is a comparative oncology research program at The Jackson Laboratory for Genomic Medicine. The goal of the initiative is to develop a canine cancer biorepository and biobank of fresh canine patient-derived xenograft (cPDX) models for genomic analysis and therapeutic studies. 

10:50 Canines, Cancer and Genetics 

Ostrander_ElaineElaine Ostrander, PhD, NIH Distinguished Investigator, Cancer Genetics and Comparative Genomics Branch 

Distinct breeds of dog differ in body shape, size, disease susceptibility and behavior. The Ostrander lab is interested in understanding the nature of genetic diversity in domestic dog breeds and how that correlates with disease susceptibility. In today’s talk, we will discuss our new studies on both morphology and cancer susceptibility.   

11:05 The Role of HER2 Mutations in Canine Lung Cancer: Translating a Genomic Discovery into a Clinical Trial 

Hendricks_WilliamWilliam Hendricks, PhD, Assistant Professor, Integrated Cancer Genomics Division, Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) 

We have discovered that naturally occurring primary canine lung cancers, which share clinical and pathologic features with human lung cancers in never-smokers, are frequently driven by activating HER2 (ERRB2) hotspot point mutations in an otherwise simple genome landscape. These findings are now driving clinical investigation of HER2 inhibitors that hold value for human and canine cancer drug development. 

11:20 PANEL DISCUSSION 

Moderator:

Breen_MatthewMatthew Breen, PhD, Professor of Genomics and the Oscar J. Fletcher Distinguished Professor of Comparative Oncology Genetics, North Carolina State University 


Panelists:

Trent_JeffreyJeffrey M. Trent, PhD, FACMG, President and Research Director, Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen)


Mockus_SusanSusan Mockus, PhD, Associate Director, Clinical Genomic Market Development, The Jackson Laboratory 


Ostrander_ElaineElaine Ostrander, PhD, NIH Distinguished Investigator, Cancer Genetics and Comparative Genomics Branch


Hendricks_WilliamWilliam Hendricks, PhD, Assistant Professor, Integrated Cancer Genomics Division, Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen)


Samir B. Amin, PhD, Postdoctoral Associate, The Jackson Laboratory 


11:40 Networking Lunch Break 

 

Part 3B: TOOLBOX: IMMUNOLOGIC ADVANCES

1:00 pm Overview: Immune Profiling and Neo-Antigen Discovery State of Play; Emerging Datasets  

Dow_StevenSteven W. Dow, DVM, MS, PhD, Diplomate ACVIM, ​Director, Center for Immune and Regenerative Medicine; Professor, Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University 


1:20 B-Cell Lymphoma: Immunogenic Mutational Load for Adoptive T-Cell Immunotherapy 

Battaglia_SebastianoSebastiano Battaglia, PhD, Assistant Professor, Oncology, Center for Immunotherapy, Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center 


1:40 Audience Q&A: Immunologic Advances

Co-Moderators:

Dow_StevenSteven W. Dow, DVM, MS, PhD, Diplomate ACVIM, ​Director, Center for Immune and Regenerative Medicine; Professor, Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University 


Battaglia_SebastianoSebastiano Battaglia, PhD, Assistant Professor, Oncology, Center for Immunotherapy, Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center 


PART 4: COLLABORATIONS AT BOTH ENDS OF THE LEASH: OSTEOsARCOMA

 

2:00 Mary’s Story: From Patient to Childhood Cancer Ambassador

Tankersley_MaryMary Tankersley, Childhood Cancer Survivor

 

 

 

 

2:05 KEYNOTE PRESENTATION: Improving Outcomes in Osteosarcoma: Dog as Man’s Best Friend

Helman_LeeLee J. Helman, MD, Professor, Departments of Pediatrics and Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California; Head, Basic and Translational Research, Children’s Center for Cancer and Blood Diseases, Children’s Hospital Los Angeles 

Survival for patients (humans and canines) with osteosarcoma has not improved for more than twenty years. In both species, patients overwhelmingly succumb to pulmonary metastases, thus the development of new approaches to prevent or cure this event is a major unmet need. This talk will discuss how studying OS in pet dogs may provide clues for progress. 

 

2:25 Genomic Landscape of Canine Osteosarcoma 

Gardner_HeatherHeather Gardner, DVM, PhD Student, Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences, Tufts University 


2:40 Enhancing Natural Killer Immunotherapy with IL-15 and Super-Agonist IL-15 in Naturally Occurring Canine Cancers 

Rebhun_RobertRobert B. Rebhun, DVM, PhD, DACVIM (Oncology), Maxine Adler Endowed Chair in Oncology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis


2:55 GD3/GD2-Based Immunotherapy in Osteosarcoma (and Melanoma) in Combination with Standard of Care 

Milner_RowanRowan Milner, DVM, PhD, Hill’s Professor of Oncology and Director for Clinical and Translational Research Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, University of Florida 


My research goals have been to develop research in true disease models of human cancer i.e. naturally occurring translational models. My goal has been to develop research in cancer vaccines as an adjuvant to conventional treatments for cancer. I have completed a clinical trials in canine melanoma (a model of human acral/mucosal melanoma) and osteosarcoma using a GD3-based vaccine approach. Recently, as part of a program to understand the way animals respond to the GD3 based vaccine and other antigens, we are investigating immune regulatory responses to the vaccine in osteosarcoma cases e.g. T-regs, MDSC’s, CD1d Tetramer (sourced from NIH Core lab Emory). We are also engaged and funded in developing a modified CAR-iNKT cell therapy. My current administrative position as Director for Clinical and Translational Research at CVM UF is to promote and foster collaborative research between Colleges in the UF Health Sciences Center.

3:10 Autologous Activated T Cell Therapy for Osteosarcoma of Companion Dogs 

Bryan_JeffreyJeffrey Bryan, DVM, MS, PhD, DACVIM-Oncology, Professor of Medical Oncology, Board-Certified Specialist in Veterinary Oncology, Veterinary Health Center, University of Missouri 

Canine osteosarcoma (OSA) is an aggressively metastatic primary bone malignancy with frequent chemotherapy failure. We hypothesized that dogs with OSA would be safely treated with autologous vaccination, adoptive T cell transfer (ACT) of ex vivo-activated T cells and low dose human interleukin-2 (IL-2) resulting in improved survival compared to carboplatin. 

3:25 The Use of a Recombinant HER2 Targeted Listeria Vaccine to Prevent and Treat Metastatic Osteosarcoma

Mason_NicolaNicola Mason, PhD, BVetMed, Associate Professor of Medicine & Pathobiology, University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine 


3:35 PANEL DISCUSSION 

Moderator:

Helman_LeeLee J. Helman, MD, Professor, Departments of Pediatrics and Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California; Head, Basic and Translational Research, Children’s Center for Cancer and Blood Diseases, Children’s Hospital Los Angeles 


Panelists: 

Gardner_HeatherHeather Gardner, DVM, PhD Student, Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences, Tufts University 


Rebhun_RobertRobert B. Rebhun, DVM, PhD, DACVIM (Oncology), Maxine Adler Endowed Chair in Oncology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis


Milner_RowanRowan Milner, DVM, PhD, Hill’s Professor of Oncology and Director for Clinical and Translational Research Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, University of Florida 


Bryan_JeffreyJeffrey Bryan, DVM, MS, PhD, DACVIM-Oncology, Professor of Medical Oncology, Board-Certified Specialist in Veterinary Oncology, Veterinary Health Center, University of Missouri 


Mason_NicolaNicola Mason, PhD, BVetMed, Associate Professor of Medicine & Pathobiology, University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine 


4:00 Networking Refreshment Break 

 

Part 5: REGULATORY ENVIRONMENT AND BIOETHICS

4:15 Opening Remarks: Bioethics & Regulatory Considerations when conducting Comparative Oncology Studies 

Carol K. Robertson-Plouch, DVM, cert ACDRS, Founder and Chief Executive, Convergence Bioscience, LLC 

 

4:20 FDA CVM/CDER & USDA: Regulatory Considerations for Use of Investigational Drugs in Companion Animals 

Leighton_JohnJohn Leighton, PhD, Division Director, US Department of Health and Human Services 


Loss_ChristopherChristopher Loss, DVM, Senior Veterinary Medical Officer, Office of New Animal Drug Evaluation (ONADE), Center of Veterinary Medicine (CVM) 

Bruce Thomsen, PhD, DVM, Veterinary Medical Officer, United States Department of Agriculture

While not widespread, there has been recent interest in investigating human drugs in companion canines to aid in drug development. From CDER’s perspective, case examples such will be discussed to illustrate the use of companion animal studies in human drug development. CVM will discuss the similarities between the animal toxicology studies supporting first in human studies and CVM’s safety studies supporting animal drug development and provide case examples where toxicology studies supporting first in human studies have supported CVM’s safety requirements. 

4:40 Best Practices and Emerging Issues  

Page_RodneyRodney Page, DVM, MS, Professor and Director, Flint Animal Cancer Center, Colorado State University; Stephen Withrow Presidential Chair in Oncology 


Baneux_PhilippePhilippe Baneux, Attending Veterinarian and Director, Center for Animal Resources and Education (CARE), Cornell University


4:55 PANEL DISCUSSION 

Moderator:

Robertson-Plouch_CarolCarol K. Robertson-Plouch, DVM, cert ACDRS, Founder and Chief Executive, Convergence Bioscience, LLC


Panelists:

Leighton_JohnJohn Leighton, PhD, Division Director, US Department of Health and Human Services 


Loss_ChristopherChristopher Loss, DVM, Senior Veterinary Medical Officer, Office of New Animal Drug Evaluation (ONADE), Center of Veterinary Medicine (CVM) 


Page_RodneyRodney Page, DVM, MS, Professor and Director, Flint Animal Cancer Center, Colorado State University; Stephen Withrow Presidential Chair in Oncology 


Baneux_PhilippePhilippe Baneux, Attending Veterinarian and Director, Center for Animal Resources and Education (CARE), Cornell University 


Day 1 WRAP UP

5:10 Closing Remarks 

Ryan Roberts, MD, PhD, Physician & Principal Investigator, Center for Childhood Cancer and Blood Diseases, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital; Member, Translational Therapeutics Research Program, The James Comprehensive Cancer Center; The Ohio State University 

5:15 Transition to Networking Reception 

5:30 Networking Reception 

6:30 Close of Day 

6:30 Dine Around Event

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13 

7:00 am Registration and Continental Breakfast 

Part 6: COURAGEOUS WARRIORS: CANCER PATIENTS’ PERSPECTIVES

7:55 Title Sponsor Welcome Remarks

Braun_SusanSusan Braun, CEO, the V Foundation for Cancer Research


8:00 PANEL DISCUSSION 

Moderator:
Lichtenfeld_LenLen Lichtenfeld, MD, Deputy Chief Medical Officer, American Cancer Society 


Panelists: 

Tankersley_MaryMary Tankersley, Childhood Cancer Survivor


Aune_GregGreg Aune, MD, PhD, Pediatric Oncologist, Greehey Children's Cancer Research Hospital


Satterfield_LeeHon. Lee Satterfield, JD, Former Chief Judge, DC Superior Court 


Schiffman_JoshuaJoshua Schiffman, MD, Professor of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology and Adjunct Professor of Oncological Sciences, Huntsman Cancer Center, University of Utah 


Part 7: COMPARATIVE IMAGING

8:45 Chairperson’s Opening Remarks 

LeBlanc_AmyAmy LeBlanc, DVM, Director, Comparative Oncology Program, National Cancer Institute  


8:50 Imaging Biomarkers in Comparative Oncology 

Jeraj_RobertRobert Jeraj, PhD, Professor, Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health 


9:05 Advanced Quantitative/Functional Imaging Applied in the Comparative Setting 

Vail_DavidDavid M. Vail, DVM, Diplomate ACVIM (Oncology), Professor and Barbara A. Suran Chair in Comparative Oncology, School of Veterinary Medicine and the Carbone Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison 

This presentation will provide clinical examples of the imaging biomarker technologies discussed in the preceding discussion by Dr. Jeraj in the context of ongoing comparative clinical trials that include companion animals. Emphasis will be placed on imaging correlates to immunotherapy response and early detection of metastasis. 

9:20 MR Imaging Technologies to Assess Hypoxia and Tumor Stroma, Two Critically Important Features of the Tumor Microenvironment 

Dewhirst_MarkMark Dewhirst, DVM, PhD, Gustavo S. Montana Professor of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Duke University 


9:35 Networking Coffee Break 

Part 8: COLLABORATIONS AT BOTH ENDS OF THE LEASH

9:45 Comparative Pathology of Canine Meningioma and Glioma 

Miller_AndrewAndrew D. Miller, DVM, Diplomate ACVP, The Robert Hovey Udall Assistant Professor and The Anne Groot Sesquicentennial Fellow, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Section of Anatomic Pathology, Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine 

In the dog, intracranial neoplasia represents approximately 3% of all primary cancers with meningioma and glioma being the most common. This talk will briefly cover the basic pathologic characteristics of canine meningioma and glioma and focus on comparative pathology features between the human and canine meningioma and glioma.   

10:05 CANINE: CANine ImmunoNEurotherapeutics: A Comparative Genomics, Oncology and Immunotherapy Consortium 

Chambers_MelissaMelissa Renee Chambers, DVM, MD, Professor, Department of Neurosurgery, School of Medicine, University of Alabama 

The biological similarities between humans and dogs are far more significant than the differences. We share more than our lives with our pets – we share our living space, our air, our recreational activities and sometimes even our food! One Medicine is the concept that veterinary and human medicines often overlap and that each can learn from the other to the benefit of both. Our  CANine  Immuno NEurotherapeutics Trial, or CANINE, has received funding from the National Institutes of Health to use human therapies to treat and study canine brain tumors. Interestingly, dogs and humans develop malignant brain tumors at about the same rate, and these tumors are biologically similar. In the trial, surgery to remove all or part of the tumor is followed by infusion of an oncolytic virus into the tumor bed. Safety and tolerability are being established in Stage I of the trial. In Stage II, a checkpoint inhibitor will be added to the treatment regimen to improve the immune response. A trial like this allows us to provide compassionate care to animals, advance the field of veterinary medicine and better understand the biological effects of treatment. “In an effort to better understand the mechanisms of this devastating disease and find therapeutic answers, we will analyze samples, data and response to treatment. In this way, each dog enrolled in the trial will help the next. Our goal with this project and the concurrent human trials is first and foremost to help people and pets with brain tumors, improving survival and quality of life. Discovering what we have in common may just be the key to a cure.” 

10:20 The Inclusion of Pet Dogs with Cancer in the Translational Development of PAC-1, a Procaspase-3 Activating Compound 

Fan_TimothyTimothy M. Fan, DVM, PhD, Professor, Department of Veterinary Clinical Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign 

PAC-1 is a small molecule activator of procaspase-3 which penetrates across the blood-brain barrier and preferentially forces cancer cells to undergo programmed cell death. Treatment of pet dogs with different types of cancers has expedited the translational testing of PAC-1 as a novel cancer therapeutic for human cancer patients. 

10:35 Addition of a Checkpoint Blockade Inhibitor to Enhance the Efficacy of Immunotherapy for High-Grade Glioma 

Pluhar_LizLiz Pluhar, DVM, PhD, Diplomate ACVS, Professor, Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota 

CD200 is a protein that acts as an immune checkpoint. CD200 is solubilized by glioma and causes immunosuppression when treating patients with immunotherapy. We developed a CD200 inhibitor to reverse the suppressive effects of the protein. We are combining this inhibitor with other immune therapies, tumor lysate vaccines or adenoviral-mediated Flt3L/TK gene therapy, to increase the amplitude and duration of tumor progression/recurrence in a canine model of glioma using pet dogs with naturally occurring disease. If successful, these combination therapies will be a novel glioma therapy for human patients. 

10:50 Accelerating a Cure in Canines-N-Kids Using Big Data Analyses 

Storm_JayJay Storm, MD, Chief of the Division of Neurosurgery, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia 

Pediatric central nervous system tumors are the leading cause of disease related death in children. Unlike most adult cancers, the etiologies of brain tumors in children are thought to encompass developmental origins and can co-occur with birth defects or other structural deformities. Similarly, central nervous system tumors in canines are likely developmental rather than environmental and cluster in certain breeds. However, the role of genetics and/or shared pathways across pediatric cancers, birth defects, and canine tumors has not been widely studied due to limited availability of datasets and shared access. In an attempt to accelerate discovery, improve integration and collaboration, and better elucidate the underpinnings of pediatric cancers and birth defects the Children’s Brain Tumor Tissue Consortium (CBTTC) and the Colorado State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital along with the NIH Kids First Data Resource are using new cloud-based platforms for large scale genomic data harmonization, shared access, and cross disease comparative analysis. 

11:05 CAR T: Linking Dogs to Kids

June_CarlCarl H. June, MD, Richard W. Vague Professor in Immunotherapy, Director, Center for Cellular Immunotherapies, Director, Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine 


11:20 Therapeutic Applications of CAR T Cell Platform in the Comparative Setting 

Mason_NicolaNicola Mason, PhD, BVetMed, Associate Professor of Medicine & Pathobiology, University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine 


11:35 Leveraging Canine Lymphoma to Optimize Immunotherapy Combination Regimens 

London_CherylCheryl London, DVM, PhD, DACVIM (Oncology), Anne Engen and Dusty Professor in Comparative Oncology, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine; Research Professor, Tufts University School of Medicine; Associated Faculty Professor, College of Veterinary Medicine, Ohio State


Richards_KristyKristy L. Richards, PhD, MD, Associate Professor, Joan and Sanford I. Weill Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medicine, Biomedical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine 


12:00 pm Networking Lunch Break 

 

Part 9: INFRASTRUCTURE FOR COMPARATIVE CANCER RESEARCH AND COMPLEMENTING FOR COLLABORATION

1:00 PANEL DISCUSSION

Moderator:

Kastan_Michael Michael Kastan, MD, PhD, Pediatric Oncologist, Executive Director of the Duke Cancer Institute, William and Jane Shingleton Professor of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology 


Panelists:

LeBlanc_AmyAmy LeBlanc, DVM, Director, Comparative Oncology Program, National Cancer Institute 


Weigel_BrendaBrenda Weigel, MD, PhD, Professor, Department of Pediatrics, Division Director, Division of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Pediatric Hematologist/Oncologist, Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota


Roberts_RyanRyan Roberts, MD, PhD, Physician & Principal Investigator, Center for Childhood Cancer and Blood Diseases, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital; Member, Translational Therapeutics Research Program, The James Comprehensive Cancer Center; The Ohio State University


Page_RodneyRodney Page, DVM, PhD, Professor and Director, Flint Animal Cancer Center, Stephen Withrow Presidential Chair in Oncology 


Clifford_CraigCraig Clifford, DVM, Director of Clinical Studies, Medical Oncologist, Hope Veterinary Specialists 


Henry_CarolynCarolyn Henry, DVM, MS, Dean, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri 


Sommers_ConnieConnie Sommers, PhD, Program Director, National Cancer Institute (NCI) 


1:45 Networking Refreshment Break

Part 10: BIOPHARMA CHALLENGES: WEAVING COMPARATIVE ONCOLOGY RESEARCH INTO DEVELOPMENT PLANS

2:00 Opening Remarks

Robertson-Plouch_CarolCarol K. Robertson-Plouch, DVM, cert ACDRS, Founder and Chief Executive, Convergence Bioscience, LLC 


2:05 PANEL DISCUSSION 

Moderator:

Robertson-Plouch_CarolCarol K. Robertson-Plouch, DVM, cert ACDRS, Founder and Chief Executive, Convergence Bioscience, LLC


Panelists:

Wahaus_TammieTammie Wahaus, CEO, ELIAS Animal Health, LLC


Ilaria_RobertRobert Ilaria, Jr., MD, Executive Medical Director, Clinical Research and Development, Celgene


Price_SylvesterG. Sylvester Price, DVM, PhD, Director of Therapeutic Evaluation, Boehringer Ingelheim Animal Health


Rhodes_LindaLinda Rhodes, VMD, PhD, Consultant


Robillard_ChrisChris Robillard, MBA, Director, Business Development, Karyopharm Therapeutics Inc.


Bertout_JessicaJessica Bertout, VMD, PhD, Director of Clinical Research, Presage Biosciences, Inc.


Gruenbaum_LoreLore M. Gruenbaum, PhD, Executive Director of Biology & Pharmacology at Applied Biomath


Brian Long, PhD, Director, Oncology Discovery Pharmacology, Merck Research Laboratories

Adreani_ChristineChristine Adreani, PhD, VMD, Director, Translational In Vivo Models Global Research Platform, Sanofi Genzyme


Part 11: HARMONIZING WHILE HOWLING AT THE MOONSHOT: PRIORITIES FOR ACCELERATING CANCER DRUG DEVELOPMENT

2:45 Audience Q&A: Needs, Gaps & Opportunities

Co-Moderators:

Breen_MatthewMatthew Breen, PhD, Professor of Genomics and the Oscar J. Fletcher Distinguished Professor of Comparative Oncology Genetics, North Carolina State University 


Roberts_RyanRyan Roberts, MD, PhD, Physician & Principal Investigator, Center for Childhood Cancer and Blood Diseases, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital; Member, Translational Therapeutics Research Program, The James Comprehensive Cancer Center; The Ohio State University 

3:55 Closing Remarks 

Ulrike Szalay, MPP, Founder, Executive Director, Canines-N-Kids Foundation 

McLeod_RobbieRobbie L McLeod, PhD, Principal Scientist, Pharmacology, Merck (Boston) Research Laboratories  

Contact